Friday, June 1, 2012

Pfannkuchen - german pancakes

Recently somebody posted a picture of "german pancakes" on Facebook.
They looked delicious - but not at all like german pancakes :-)

So I thought you might be interested to see how I make them:

Basically, you need


Eggs, Milk, Flour, a bowl and a beater, a hand-mixer is even better.

German girls learn that per person you need one egg, 2 Tablespoons (with biiiiiiig mountains!) of flour and a shot of milk. That shot of milk is kind of the tricky part, because you need to have it in your guts *g*

I measured for you, and I used about 1 1/2 cups of milk for 4 eggs and 8 tablespoons (overloaded) of flour.

If you want these pancakes to be healthier, you can either add whole wheat flour or almond flour, or both.


My kids prefer plain white flour, but they usually don't complain if I use half white flour, 2 Tablespoons of whole wheat and 2 Tablespoons of almond flour. 

You just beat the eggs, add the milk (beat) and then the flour (beat) - that's it. Usually, you will have a little helper around


Then you heat up a pan (medium to low), add some oil, and bake one pancake per time


Flip around once when the surface becomes solid


Traditionally, you will just sprinkle some sugar on your pancake (about 1 teaspoon per pancake)


But of course there are other options:

Apple-Pancakes (Slice an apple and put the slices in the cake while baking. The flipping will be the a little tricky)

Cheese Pancakes


Just sprinkle some cheese (Mozzarella, Monterey Jack, Gouda, ....) after flipping.

Or add some applesauce after baking


even better with a little bit of whipping cream *g*

Or add some greek vanilla yoghurt (after baking)

Or ham or bacon, corn, mushrooms, bell peppers... while baking.
Delicious: chopped spinach and lox.

If there are leftovers, sprinkle with sugar, roll up


cut in stripes - and you have already part of your kids lunch for tomorrow



Please not, that traditionally in Germany, you would eat pancakes for lunch or dinner, not for breakfast.
(Though they are great for breakfast, too. We make it sometimes)

French crepes are very similar, just really thin, so you will add some butter to the batter to make it more flexible. (And at some cognac. But just for adults, please.)

French crepes are always sweet, if they are savory, you will call them "galettes" and the batter is made with buckwheat instead of wheat.
Try them with cheese, ham and an egg - this is called "galette complete"


2 comments:

  1. Mein Pfannkuchenrezept (umrechnen und übersetzen muß jemand anderes, bitte):

    Für 4 Personen (ca. 8 Pfannkuchen)
    250g Weizenmehl, 4 Eier, 1 Prise Zucker, 1 Prise Salz, 375ml Milch und 125 ml Mineralwasser

    Das Mineralwasser macht die Pfannkuchen etwas "fluffiger". Richtig locker werden die Pfannkuchen, wenn man die Eier trennt, aus dem Eiweiß Eischnee macht und ihn kurz vor dem Backen unter den Teig rührt. Mjam.

    Mein Mann liebt sie mit Championfüllung: 200g Speck und 2 Zwiebeln würfeln und in Butter anbraten, 750g Champions dazu , gar dünsten, 1 EL Weizenmehl drüberstäuben und einen Becher Crme fraiche unterrühren, mit Salz und Pfeffer abschmecken.

    Pfannkuchen schmecken immer

    LG Claudia W aus Hamburg

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you for posting this. This is more like what I grew up with, but it has been so long ago I forgot how to make. All the other recipes I have seen use a lot more flour and I knew that was the way we did it.

    ReplyDelete